Science Pub

Science Pub Portland: Easter Island

Revisiting Easter Island's Mysterious Past

With Terry Hunt, PhD, Dean of the Clark Honors College and Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oregon


Doors Open @ 5PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 

Rapa Nui (Easter Island) is widely known for its mysterious past:  a remote and deforested island covered with nearly a thousand giant statues. What happened and when did it happen?  Rapa Nui has also become the “poster child” for societal collapse resulting from reckless human actions.  In this lecture Dr. Hunt critically re-evaluates the conventional narrative for this mysterious past.  He also revisits one of the most intriguing questions for the island:  how were the colossal statues transported to every corner of the island.  Science, history, and native traditions converge in Dr. Hunt’s widely acclaimed research on Rapa Nui’s past.

 

Terry Hunt is Dean of the Clark Honors College and Professor of Anthropology, at the University of Oregon. He is also Professor Emeritus in Anthropology at University of Hawai`i. He earned his Bachelor's Degree at University of Hawai`i, Hilo; his Master's Degree (First Class Honors) at University of Auckland (New Zealand); and his Ph.D. at University of Washington (1989).  Dr. Hunt taught at University of Hawai`i for 25 years, and recently moved to University of Oregon in his new role as Dean. Dr. Hunt has been conducting archaeological field research in the Pacific Islands for more than 35 years.  He has done extensive work in the Hawaiian Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Papua New Guinea, and Easter Island.  

 


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Science Pub Portland: Social Drinking & Voles

"A Vole Walks Into A Bar..." What Animals Tell Us About Social Drinking

With Caroline Hostetler, PhD, Senior Research Associate in the Oregon Health and Science Department of Behavioral Neuroscience and Portland VA Medical Center


Doors Open @ 5PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 

Social relationships play a powerful role to both promote and inhibit alcohol drinking. Likewise, alcohol drinking can make us more social, but can also be quite harmful to personal relationships. Studying social animals in the laboratory may help us identify the biological underpinnings of these interactions between alcohol and social environment.

This talk will primarily focus on recent research on the prairie vole, a monogamous rodent species.  Monogamy includes pair bonding and biparental care, and while these behaviors are important for humans, they are rare among mammals. Prairie voles are an excellent model for understanding the evolution and neuroscience of social behavior. Research on voles has even contributed to the development of clinical trials for drug treatments for autism spectrum disorders and alcoholism.  During this talk, we will discuss how voles can be used to model social drinking, first dates, and even treatment outcomes for alcohol addiction. You may realize you aren’t so different from a varmint after all.

Caroline M. Hostetler, PhD, is a behavioral neuroscientist using animal models of social behavior to inform prevention and future therapies for alcohol use disorder. Dr. Hostetler received her B.S. in Biology from the University of Maryland, and a PhD in Psychology from the University of California at Davis. She is currently a Senior Research Associate in the Oregon Health and Science Department of Behavioral Neuroscience and Portland VA Medical Center. She has worked with a variety of animals, including golden lion tamarins, titi monkeys, rhesus macaques, vervet monkeys, California mice, meadow voles, prairie voles, and humans. She is also an active member of the Portland Women in Science group, encouraging retention, advocacy, and mentorship of women in the sciences across the greater Portland area.

 


For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.


For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.