Science Pub

Science Pub Corvallis: Designing Robots to Walk and Run

With Jonathan Hurst, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Oregon State University


$5 Suggested Donation
 

Robots already build cars, perform household chores and explore the oceans, but these machines are not ready to walk safely among humans. Neither can they undertake tasks in unpredictable situations such as looking for survivors in collapsed buildings after an earthquake. In this talk, Jonathan Hurst will describe efforts at Oregon State to take robotic systems to this next level.

 

Hurst is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and a leader of OSU’s growing robotics program. Working with OSU students and with colleagues at the University of Michigan and Carnegie-Mellon, he designed a robot known as ATRIAS, the first machine to reproduce human-like and animal-like ground reaction forces and center-of-mass motion for a bipedal walking gait. The researchers derive inspiration from the locomotion of birds.

 

Hurst’s research is supported by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency, the National Science Foundation, and the Human Frontiers Research Organization. He received his Ph.D. at Carnegie-Mellon and came to Oregon State in 2008.


Fore more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Portland: Deep-Sea Hot Springs

With Anna-Louise Reysenbach, PhD, Professor of Microbiology in the Biology Department at PSU


Doors Open @ 6PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 
Most of the biodiversity of life on Earth is microbial. These microscopic organisms occupy almost any conceivable habitat where there is available water, energy and carbon for growth. They live in some of the most salty, cold, hot, nutrient-starved, dry and acidic places on this planet, and they form critical partnerships with many other organisms, including us. At deep-sea vents, microorganisms form the base of the food web, fueling the chemosynthetic-based ecosystem. Here, as the very hot hydrothermal fluids mix with the cold seawater, minerals precipitate out a solution to form mineral deposits called ‘chimneys’. These porous rocks provide habitats for a plethora of new heat-loving microbes, thermophiles.
 
Using a combination of genomic, ecological and microbiological approaches, Dr Reysenbach will provide insights into how the geology and geochemistry at the deep-sea vents helps drive the diversity of microbes in these systems, and has led to the discovery of many novel branches on the Tree of Life. Many of these organisms have potential medical and industrial applications, and help inform us better when looking for signs of life elsewhere in the Solar System.
 
Dr. Reysenbach is a microbial ecologist whose research focuses on life in high temperature environments. Her work has taken her to many of the terrestrial and deep-sea hot springs around the world. She has led deep-sea research expeditions using the submersible, Alvin or remotely operated vehicle, Jason to work on the microbes that inhabit the high temperature deep-sea vents. She is internationally known for her research using a combination of genomic and microbial culturing approaches to explore the diversity of microbes in these extreme environments. She has published her research in journals such as Nature and Science, and has participated in several documentaries for BBC, NOVA, OPB among others. She has served on NASA’s Planetary Science Subcommittee and the National Research Council, and serves as an editor for several scientific journals. Her research has been funded by NSF and NASA. Dr. Reysenbach has a Ph.D. from University of Cape Town, South Africa and is Professor of Microbiology in the Biology Department at Portland State University.


For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Portland: Physics of Music

With Christine McKinley, Mechanical Engineer, Musician, and Author


Doors Open @ 5PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 
Details coming soon!


Dinner will be available in our restaurant, Theory, or from the Empirical Café. Guests can check-in at the theater entrance to reserve a seat before grabbing dinner and drinks. Food and drink are welcome in the theater. Parking is free for the event. Doors open at 5pm.
 
For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Portland: Cancer Genome

With Dr. Christopher Corless, MD, PhD, Medical Director of the Cancer Pathology Share Resource at OHSU


Doors Open @ 5PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 
Details coming soon!


Dinner will be available in our restaurant, Theory, or from the Empirical Café. Guests can check-in at the theater entrance to reserve a seat before grabbing dinner and drinks. Food and drink are welcome in the theater. Parking is free for the event. Doors open at 5pm.
 
For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Portland: Cancer

With Dr. William Winter, MD, Gynecologic Oncologist at Legacy Medical Group


Doors Open @ 5PM | $5 Suggested Donation
 
Details coming soon!


Dinner will be available in our restaurant, Theory, or from the Empirical Café. Guests can check-in at the theater entrance to reserve a seat before grabbing dinner and drinks. Food and drink are welcome in the theater. Parking is free for the event. Doors open at 5pm.
 
For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Hillsboro: Understanding Wine Terroir

With Elizabeth Tomasino, PhD, Assistant Professor of Enology, Dept. of Food Science & Technology at Oregon State University & member of the Oregon Wine Research Institute


$5 Suggested Donation
 
Is it reasonable to say that food products from different regions can be distinguished from one another? Many producers believe this and so some items are marketed as originating from a specific region, such as Willamette Valley Pinot Noir. This suggests that geographic origin produces quality attributes that cannot be duplicated in other locations.
 
In this talk Elizabeth Tomasino will describe the factors that are important to wine terroir, including specific examples of Oregon terroir and how these compare to other famous wine terroir. She will also provide insight on a consumer’s view of terroir and how it relates to quality.
 
Elizabeth Tomasino, Ph.D. specializes in wine chemistry and sensory analysis, specifically determining the relationships between wine composition and sensory perception. Additionally she works on understanding and defining terroir from a sensory perspective. She received her doctorate from Lincoln University in New Zealand and has worked for E&J Gallo, Yalumba Winery (Australia) and Robert Mondavi Winery. Currently she is an assistant professor of enology at Oregon State University and core member of the Oregon Wine Research Institute. She also runs the OWRI sensory panel. Her work allows her to interact with the wine industry in Oregon but also around the world and allows her to explore many different types of science. 
 

This Science Pub is part of a food science series at all four Science Pub locations in September, and was made possible by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.


For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.

Science Pub Eugene: Biochemistry In Brewing

With Jared Clark, Ninkasi Sensory Technician


$5 Suggested Donation
 

Discover the living world of beer from Ninkasi Brewing Company’s on-site sensory technician, Jared Clark. From the very cultivation and harvesting of beer’s foundational ingredients to the volatile fermentation process to packaging and consuming, each living stage plays a particular role in either making a delicious beer or causing detriment to one that once was. In this talk, Jared will explain each biochemical change throughout beers’ lifespan from farm to bottle.
 
Jared Clark is an experienced biochemist with a passion for brewing science. A graduate from Oregon State University, he earned his Bachelors of Science in Food Science & Technology and Mathematics with a minor in Chemistry in 2010. Since then, he has worked in QA and sensory analysis for companies in the food and beverage industry including Firestone Walker Brewing Co. in Paso Robles, California. After joining Ninkasi Brewing Company in 2013 as the brewery’s lead sensory technician, his main roles include: training employees and distribution partners on sensory analysis and methodology, leading sensory panels to test the quality of each beer produced, and performing subsequent analysis on data prior to releasing product to trade. When not working in the sensory lab, Jared enjoys gardening, hiking, and traveling around Oregon.

 

This Science Pub is part of a food science series at all four Science Pub locations in September, and was made possible by the Oregon Department of Agriculture.


For more information or to sign up for our mailing list, email: sciencepub@omsi.edu.