For the Love of Time

On a given Saturday at the museum you may encounter a group of avid tinkerers in the Turbine Hall.

The local chapter of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC 31) has had a long relationship with OMSI. For almost two decades the group has been coming to OMSI to maintain and repair the antique Oregonian Clock in the Turbine Hall mezzanine.

Members share a love of both timekeeping and community service. Some are collectors and hobbyists; others repair clocks and watches for a living.

Be Brain Aware

As a museum, OMSI is lucky to have cultivated relationships with community partners like the Oregon Health & Science University. Twelve years ago OMSI began a partnership with OHSU's Brain Institute to promote their Brain Awareness Season. The season is a chance for OHSU to share the latest, most riveting knowledge about neuroscience through workshops, community activities, and a lecture series. The Brain Institue and OMSI hosted the twelth OHSU Brain Fair here at the museum earlier this month.

I Feel the Earth Move...

Living in the pacific northwest gives us some familiarity with earthquakes. You've probably felt one or two right? But what about those large and disastrous quakes, like the one that hit Japan a couple years ago, or the one that created the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004? We're lucky that most quakes in Oregon are fairly small-scale. California bears the brunt of earthquake-related damage on the west coast and even the Seattle region gets hit more often than Portland.

The Mysterious Moon

Why do we only see one side of the moon?

What is it about the moon? Why does it only present one face? These questions are part of the most popular myth in astronomy. Whenever you take a look at the moon, you will always see the same side. Aside from its familiar phases, it looks as if the moon doesn't rotate! This is a difficult concept for many people to understand.

Tools, Tech and Teens: A-TAC Update

A-TAC, the Awesome Teen Advisory Council, has been industriously jamming out on projects since their debut at OMSI’s Mini Maker Faire last September. As a little refresher, A-TAC (Awesome Teen Advisory Council) is the design and programming conscience of OMSI and Multnomah County Library’s forthcoming Maker Center.

Plastics at SEA: Part II

On October 3, 2012 OMSI Educator Emilee Monson embarked on a ocean-bound trip along with 37 other scientists, teachers, students, and sailors. The Plastics at SEA: North Pacific Expedition was a scientific research study conducted by Sea Education Association (SEA) and dedicated to studying the effects of plastic marine debris in the ocean ecosystem. The expedition also aimed to provide updates of floating plastic concentrations in the region known as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch".

Plastics at SEA: Part I

On October 3, 2012 OMSI Educator Emilee Monson embarked on a ocean-bound trip along with 37 other scientists, teachers, students, and sailors. The Plastics at SEA: North Pacific Expedition was a scientific research study conducted by Sea Education Association (SEA) and dedicated to studying the effects of plastic marine debris in the ocean ecosystem. The expedition also aimed to provide updates of floating plastic concentrations in the region known as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch".

Playing with Senses

In Science Playground, we love to keep our senses engaged and our minds open to exploration by playing with sensory materials such as flubber and playdough. If you have been to our space at OMSI, you might have noticed that we are not the only ones interested in playing with these types of materials.

A Counting Catharsis

It was anyone’s game by the time B Watch was stood-down that night. Noah Citron (the low-baller at 1,987 pieces) was close but not quite out. I was secretly rooting for Mike Gil (2,300 pieces). Mike was the only A Watcher in the pool, and the idea of him walking away with the entire bin of B Watch’s midnight snacks plus one vegan cupcake was more than a little entertaining. Being the only vegan in the pool, I wouldn’t be able to savor the victory snacks myself. I was, however, curious about the ship’s going-rate between baked goods and shower-day trades.

Hot Hands, Instant Crystals, and Super Cool Solutions

As the weather gets colder, fingers get frosty. Most chemical hand warmers are single use and take a while to warm up. But it's easy to make an instant, reusable hot pack with two simple ingredients: baking soda and vinegar. Follow the recipe below to make your own at home!

Materials:
  • 1 cup white vinegar (acetic acid C2O2H4)
  • 5 level teaspoons of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate NaHCO3
OR

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