Making Monsters

OMSI is taking Science on the move! Did you see a chicken coop at the Rose Quarter or a monster-making kiosk at the Gresham transit center? Wondering what this is all about? Both experiences are part of OMSI's Science on the Move project funded by the National Science Foundation. The goal of the project is to explore innovative ways to engage adults in science learning outside of museums.

iPhones, Tablets, Apps and... Kids

Recently we received an iPad in Science Playground through a grant introducing mobile technology on the museum floor. To be honest, we were a bit lost on the best ways to use it at first. The American Association of Pediatrics recommends zero screen time for kids under two years, and many parents and early childhood caregivers are wary of exposing young kids to mobile technology.

The Tryptophan Myth

Food Science is happening! Expect to see many fun activities, games and demonstrations taking place just inside the entrance of Theory, OMSI’s eatery. Stop by our food science cart to experience the difference between flavor and taste, learn about what’s in your food, or put your science goggles and lab coats on to test foods for the presence of protein.

Welcome Baby (Gecko)

We have some exciting news to share out of the Life Science Lab! A Madagascar Day Gecko was born this summer. We have bred insects and axolotls (a type of salamander) with success, but this is the first time one of the reptiles in the lab has had offspring.

 

MAKER[Space] an Ongoing Experiment

Cha...cha...changes are afoot in the OMSI Vernier Technology Lab.

Why the Changes?

Congratulations Rising Stars

This summer, OMSI has hosted 32 bright high school students in our Rising Stars Program. Rising Stars provides volunteer opportunities for students ages 14-18 to gain valuable, hands-on experience working with museum visitors. During their 5-week session, Rising Stars attend a weekly class focusing on leadership and presentation skills, making science a hands-on topic, as well as professionalism and how to succeed in today's workplace.

All Washed Up

When it come to busting up grease and dirt, few things work better than soap, thanks to the amazing structure of soap molecules! These molecules work by having two very different sides. One side is an oxygen (O) ion loosely hanging on to a sodium (Na) or potassium (K) ion. An ion is an electrically charged atom or group of atoms. Because this end is very similar to water molecules (H2O) it can mix well with water. The other end is a long chain of carbon and hydrocarbon (H) atoms linked together.

Celebrate Our Ocean!

Why should you care about the ocean? While oceans cover over 70% of Earth’s surface area, we have explored less than 10% this vast region to date. The ocean helps regulate the planet’s temperature and weather systems while providing valuable natural resources and nourishment to us. (Research provided by NOAA)

How to Prepare for an Earthquake

April is Earthquake Preparedness Month. Oregon State University scientists estimate a 40 percent chance of an 8.0 or larger earthquake in the Coos Bay, Oregon area during the next 50 years. Do you have an emergency kit? Visit the Red Cross website below for a list of items to include in one. Prepare at least one week of food, water, and medications in your disaster kit. And don't forget favorite toys and books for the kids!

Red Cross Emergency Kit

For the Love of Time

On a given Saturday at the museum you may encounter a group of avid tinkerers in the Turbine Hall.

The local chapter of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC 31) has had a long relationship with OMSI. For almost two decades the group has been coming to OMSI to maintain and repair the antique Oregonian Clock in the Turbine Hall mezzanine.

Members share a love of both timekeeping and community service. Some are collectors and hobbyists; others repair clocks and watches for a living.

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