The Mysterious Moon

Why do we only see one side of the moon?

What is it about the moon? Why does it only present one face? These questions are part of the most popular myth in astronomy. Whenever you take a look at the moon, you will always see the same side. Aside from its familiar phases, it looks as if the moon doesn't rotate! This is a difficult concept for many people to understand.

Tools, Tech and Teens: A-TAC Update

A-TAC, the Awesome Teen Advisory Council, has been industriously jamming out on projects since their debut at OMSI’s Mini Maker Faire last September. As a little refresher, A-TAC (Awesome Teen Advisory Council) is the design and programming conscience of OMSI and Multnomah County Library’s forthcoming Maker Center.

Agate to Opal: Gems of the Northwest

OMSI has been a hands-on science museum from the beginning, but it may surprise some people that we also feature collections! In fact OMSI houses over 30,000 pieces including natural history, ethnographic and historical objects. We also partner with other museums and institutions to bring their collections to the public.

Plastics at SEA: Part II

On October 3, 2012 OMSI Educator Emilee Monson embarked on a ocean-bound trip along with 37 other scientists, teachers, students, and sailors. The Plastics at SEA: North Pacific Expedition was a scientific research study conducted by Sea Education Association (SEA) and dedicated to studying the effects of plastic marine debris in the ocean ecosystem. The expedition also aimed to provide updates of floating plastic concentrations in the region known as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch".

Plastics at SEA: Part I

On October 3, 2012 OMSI Educator Emilee Monson embarked on a ocean-bound trip along with 37 other scientists, teachers, students, and sailors. The Plastics at SEA: North Pacific Expedition was a scientific research study conducted by Sea Education Association (SEA) and dedicated to studying the effects of plastic marine debris in the ocean ecosystem. The expedition also aimed to provide updates of floating plastic concentrations in the region known as the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch".

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