Teen Science Alliance: The Scientists of Tomorrow

At OMSI, we believe one of our fundamental goals is to inspire future generations to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math. Whether it’s through a visit to our museum, a stay at Camp Hancock, or by attending one of our many classes, we strive to reach audiences throughout Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. 

The Antarctic Files: Part IV

It is now the beginning of September and we are well into the latter half of our winter season. I say ‘winter’ but it might be more appropriate if we called our seasons here ‘light’ and ‘dark’ or maybe ‘cold’ and ‘even colder’. Twice now we have seen the ambient temperature (before wind chill) drop below -100°F. Mid-winter occurred for us on June 22 while those of you back home in the northern hemisphere enjoyed the first day of summer. The occasion was celebrated with a formal dinner followed by some community festivities.

Paleo Lab Treasure: Thalattosaur

While Dinosaurs Unearthed is on exhibit this summer, you can find real dinosaurs and other prehistoric animal fossils and bones in OMSI's Paleontology Lab. 

When Greg Carr started volunteering at OMSI in December 2012, he was part of a package deal. Greg followed his once-in-a-lifetime fossil discovery “Bernie” to the Paleontology Lab. What makes this jumbled collection of bones so special? These are the oldest bones ever found in Oregon.

Cycles of Science

What's going on at OMSI? That's the question I get asked the most when people hear I work as an educator here. The answer... lots! So much that it's difficult to condense into a simple answer or even to list on the website all that we do. But we do want to get some of that information out to interested science-minded people, and so this blog.

The Antarctic Files: Part III

In late March (on our fall equinox), the Sun finally fell below the horizon. Coinciding with sunset, we were looking forward to seeing an atmospheric effect called a ‘green flash,’ but unfortunately it was overcast at the time. This green flash can be seen elsewhere in the world during sunset or sunrise over a clean, clear horizon (such as over the ocean on a calm, clear day) but can be more prolonged here due to the relative speed of the Sun. However we did distinctly see another atmospheric effect, that of the Earth’s shadow being cast across the sky.

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